The Uninventor

I treated myself the other week to getting the latest book of short stories by Neil Gaiman, one of my favourite authors, out of the library. He’s a fantastic writer with many clever ideas and stories to tell. One of his greatest talents in my opinion is his ability to have fun with words, to play around with them. For example in one of his books he picks up on London Underground tube station names and speculates what it would be like if we took them literally. Just who is the Baron from Baron’s Court, and what is his court like anyway? Who or what is the knight of Knightsbridge and so on. Brilliant! Trigger Warnings, his new book, is full of such playfulness. In one of the stories he speculates on if you can have inventors, whether you could you have uninventors too? The main character is such a figure and the story tells about how he set out to uninvent all the inventions that have made the world a worse place since he was born (of course it’s foolishness to change the past before you were born, as Back to the Future warned us, all sorts of crazy family implications may occur). You know we were told that there’d be flying cars by now? Well, there were, but he uninvented them – the skies got just too congested. It’s just as if they’d never been!

This got me wondering, what would you uninvent if you could do so? What inventions or fashions do you think have made the world a worse place – serious or flippant, I’d love to know!

An alternative take on this story would be to ask not what you would uninvent but what you would undo. Are there things you’ve seen or heard you wish you hadn’t? Are there things you’ve said or done that you wish you could undo? I’m sure the answer for all of us would be yes despite protestations otherwise, we all have regrets, for all of us there are ‘if onlys’. Of course our regrets have a role in making us the people we are as we work through the consequences; to go back and undo the past would change us and others and maybe not always for the best. Adversary breeds courage, suffering character, and reflection on our wrongs and frailties can make us humble and perhaps a bit more gracious (perhaps taking liberty with Rom. 5:3-4 but I think it’s fair). Like the pearl, sometimes we need trouble to bring out the beauty in us. I think add much as it sounds a wonderful idea, being an undoer sounds far too dangerous to me! My vision and understanding is far too narrow.

Maybe this is where God’s wisdom shines. As Romans tells us, he uses all situations for the good of the believer (Rom. 8:28) – could this also include times when bring suffering on ourselves and others as will as when others are the cause? He forgives and forgets (PS. 103:7-12), whilst leaving us to face and grow through the consequences of our actions under the guidance of his Spirit.

Church Newsletter Article, 17.05.15

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